shibari

Rope Salon 25th March @ Club X, Glasgow

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Event details here 

sa·lon

noun – a regular social gathering, especially of artists and intellectuals, for both discussion and the presentation of new ideas


Rope Salon is a discussion with likeminded people
Rope Salon is a space to tie and be tied
Rope Salon is a place for new ideas, innovation and art
Rope Salon is a safe haven


Whether you are new to rope or one of our regulars you are welcome to join us for an evening of social tying and networking.

We welcome all skill levels, approaches, identities and orientations to our space. You don’t need to be a member of any special groups or have asked permission to come along. Just turn up on the night. You can purchase a ticket in advance if you like, but most people just slip us a shiny fiver at the door.

You don’t even need to be tying to join us. Watchers are welcome too.

Format

  • Doors open from 7pm. Last entry by 9pm
  • Discussion and socialising in seated area
  • Tying space available in open plan area with some seated observation/sketching space
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Isabelle Hanikamu and Stella on stage @Twisted, March 2017

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Rope Salon – 7th July 2016 at Club X

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A new idea from StORE, we present Rope Salon.

Rope Salon is a discussion with likeminded people
Rope Salon is a space to tie and be tied
Rope Salon is a place for new ideas, innovation and art
Rope Salon is a safe haven


Club X is at 68 Virginia St, Glasgow

Entry is £5

Format

  • Doors open from 7pm. Last entry by 9pm
  • Discussion and socialising in seated area with suggestions on each table for topics
  • Tying space available in open plan area with some seated observation/sketching space
  • Demonstrations and Presentations by invited guests on selected nights

Expected behaviour

  • Socialising and group discussion to be kept to the bar and seated areas.
  • Alcohol consumption in moderation is allowed.
  • Be polite to others.
  • Have fun, experiment and innovate.
  • Use the space to meet new tying partners in a safe and monitored environment
  • Please respect the privacy of others.
  • No cameras or mobile phone recordings please. Those wishing to capture artistic imagery should discuss it with the organisers first.

Tying space guidelines

  • Our tying space is open to all levels of skill and styles of tying
  • The space is for interpersonal exchange based on the use of rope only. No canes, crops, floggers etc
  • Swimwear level of nudity at most.
  • No intimate touching.
  • Any patron who is drunk will not be allowed into the tying area, even to observe.

Safe Haven

  • Rope Salon respects the right of all patrons to express themselves as individuals
  • Rope Salon will take a Zero Tolerance approach to any kind of harassment or prejudice towards our patrons
  • The venue is an LGBT space and we are the guest of that community.
  • The Safeword RED applies to all parts of the space. If used by anyone in your area please give them your attention and react appropriately.
  • If anyone is making you feel uncomfortable in any way you can approach any of the staff for help. If the person you’d like to speak about is nearby or you need discretion please use the phrase “Have you seen Monica or Joe this evening?”. Our staff will know to take you somewhere private to discuss the problem with you.
  • We take safety very seriously. We hope that the space will be self-policing, but staff will reserve the right to intervene on safety grounds. Feedback will be provided after the situation is made safe.

Rope Salon is NOT a fetish or BDSM event. Whilst it is being listed on Fetlife you should think of it as being much more like a social dance evening. As such our “rules” are based on Scottish Law and allowable activity in a public setting.

Tying the Male Physique – whole body positions

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At the Tying the Male Physique workshop we cover various positions that are well suited to masculine bodies and emphasise desirable features. We will provide a summary of the positions here, but not the detail of how to do the tie which we believe is best learned first hand at one of the workshops. The diagrams should provide a good memory jog for those who have come along!

The Hogtie

dogtie

The Hogtie is any position where the wrists and ankles are bound together. This can be done with your subject lying on the ground or in a kneeling position. It is quite a difficult position to move out of without assistance and as such is a great leveler used on someone who is bigger or stronger than you are. Be careful of leaving someone on their front for too long however as breathing may become difficult over time. Roll them onto their side however and they are still vulnerable but more ahem accessible.

frogtieThe Frogtie

 
In the frogtie the arms and legs are tied into a folded position so that they resemble the bent leg of a frog before it jumps. This is a surprisingly comfortable position and keeps most of the front of the body clear of rope and will emphasise the muscles of the upper arm and legs. Due to the arched position when tied lying back it’s a great way to fake a toned set of abs thanks to the effects of posture and gravity!

dogtieThe Dogtie
The dogtie can really be considered any tie that produces an “on all fours” position similar to that of a dog. This is just one example. It’s probably not the most flattering of positions, but who doesn’t like a man on his knees? This is most definitely a functional position rather than a beautiful one!

The Yuki Knot – Basic

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This is the basic non tightening cuff that is taught at Kinbaku Alba workshops. There are lots of different ways to tie a non tightening cuff or single column tie. You don’t have to use this one if you have another one you prefer.

Whatever style of knot is used it must not tighten the cuff when the standing end is pulled, and remain easy to un-tie even if the knot compacts.

The Yuki Knot or Boola Boola Knot

  1. Double over your rope and find the middle (the bight).
    • To find the bight take both ends of the rope together in one hand and pull the ends along together until you reach the loop where they both meet
  2. Wrap once over the top of the thing you wish to tie
    • This gives more control over the limb being tied
    • You should try to hold the tension in the wrap as shown
  3. Wrap again taking care to keep the tension of both wraps the same and pass the bight over the top of all the wraps
    • If you need more rope simply pull some through using your thumb and forefinger to keep the tension
  4. Pass the bight under all the wraps
    • If you press up with a finger under the wraps you will keep your tension
  5. Make a loop in your standing end
    • Pay close attention to the direction of the loop. It is a half turn in the same direction the wraps were applied
  6. Pull the bight through the loop and pull to tighten

 

Tied properly this cuff will not tighten no matter how much load is put on the standing end yet will be easy to undo by pulling on the bight to open up the knot.

This knot works best with natural fibre ropes. It may not be reliable with synthetic ropes and is especially prone to failure with climbing ropes. All of the tutorials on Kinbaku Alba are based on natural fiber twisted ropes.

 

Comfortable & Safe Basic Anatomy

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Whilst in essence you can put rope just about anywhere on a human body there are a few key areas to be aware of to avoid discomfort and injury.

  1. ManDangerSpotsWrists can be safely used as anchor points but take care to tie loosely and preferably above the radial styloid process (the lumpy bit). Avoid pressure at the base of the thumb where the main blood vessels and nerves pass through
  2. Avoid putting knots in the antecubital fossa (inner elbow) as these may compress the brachial artery, median & radial nerve.
  3. Avoid knots in the supraclavicular fossa (the dip above the collar bone) as these can compress a multitude of arteries, ligaments and can feel as though they are compressing the windpipe.
  4. Do not place knots in the axillae (armpits) as these will be uncomfortable for most people and may compress the brachial plexus. People with larger arms are more susceptible to this and may even get intolerable discomfort by simply putting their arms behind their back.
  5. Take care with running ropes between the legs and around the genital area. Small amounts of pressure can become intolerable quite quickly.
  6. Take care with any rope running over the front of the lower leg as most people have an acutely sensitive boney area here. It is slightly different for each person.
    ManDangerSpots2
  7. Take care with knots or pressure at the back of the skull or extreme extension of the neck (head tipping backwards). This may cause Vertebrobasilar insufficiency in susceptible people which can cause anything from slight dizziness to stroke. This also gets nicknamed Beauty Parlour Stroke as it has been described in a number of people having their hair washed at a hairdressing salon sink.
  8. Most people have a bony prominence at the base of the neck. Don’t put knots on this as it can be very sore to lie on
  9. Similarly avoid knots on the shoulder blades.
  10. Avoid putting pressure or knots on the outside of the elbow joints as you may put pressure on the ulnar nerve
  11. Don’t put knots in the popliteal fossa (back of the knee) as these may compress arteries, nerves and veins in this area.
  12. Avoid placing knots on the bony prominences of the ankles. It hurts.
    ManDangerSpots3
  13. When placing large amounts of pressure on the upper arms care is needed to avoid placing pressure on the radial, median and ulnar nerves. This becomes very important in suspensions or when lying someone on the floor on top of bands of rope. Each individual has a “sweet spot” where the nerves are more exposed. If you ever gave someone (or were given) a “dead arm” in a school playground then that’s the same spot. Some people will be very sensitive. Others won’t have any bother at all. Get to know your partner and go with which positions feel best to them.
  14. See combination of 2 & 10
  15. See 6

Introduction to Ichinawa/One rope techniques – 30th March 2014

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aijinnawa

Style(s ): Japanese/Eastern. Connective.
Level : Beginner and up
Capacity : 8 attendees
Venue : Private venue in North Lanarkshire

Description: Small hands on group session on one rope/ichinawa techniques. Due to venue constraints there will be only 8 places available. This is an introductory session and will be repeated again in the future.

Required knowledge/equipment: Competence in any variant of the single column tie is essential. You should aim to bring your own rope although some can be borrowed on the day. This session will presume the use of traditional length kinkbaku rope (7-8m ropes, natural fibre, 4-6mm diameter)

Please register your interest in attending using the RSVP function or by mailing directly. Please only reserve a place if you know you can attend.


Planned ties:
片手首縛り – Katate kubi shibari- Single wrist binding
変形前手縄 – Henkei Mae Te Nawa – Variation on tied hands in…

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